More than a year after the agreement with Russia, British and French representatives, Sir Mark Sykes and Fran├žois Georges Picot, have drafted another secret agreement on the future spoils of the First World War. Picot represented a small group determined to ensure France`s control of Syria; For its part, Sykes asked the United Kingdom to compensate for the influence in the region. The deal largely overlooked the future growth of Arab nationalism, which the British government and military used to their advantage against the Turks. quizizz.com/admin/quiz/56e2cb588e29d44c36f4dec7/ap-euro-review After the outbreak of war in the summer of 1914, the Allies had many discussions about the future of the Ottoman Empire, which was now fighting on the side of Germany and the middle powers and its huge territories in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and southern Europe. In March 1915, Britain signed a secret agreement with Russia, whose plans on the territory of the Empire had led the Turks to join forces with Germany and Austria-Hungary in 1914. Russia would annex the Ottoman capital Constantinople and retain control of the Dardanelles (the extremely important strait that connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean) and the Gallipoli Peninsula, which began in April 1915. In exchange, Russia would accept British claims to other territories of the former Ottoman Empire and central Pere, including the oil-rich region of Mesopotamia. www.raleighcharterhs.org/faculty/bnewmark/euroquizzes.html In the Sykes-Picot Agreement, concluded on May 19, 1916, France and Britain divided the Arab territories of the former Ottoman Empire into spheres of influence. In the area provided for, it was agreed that each country may establish direct or indirect administration or control, as it wishes and as appropriate to reach an agreement with the Arab State or the Confederation of Arab States. Under Sykes-Picot, the Syrian coast and much of today`s Lebanon went to France; Britain would take direct control of central and southern Mesopotamia around the provinces of Baghdad and Basra.

Palestine would have an international administration, since other Christian powers, namely Russia, were interested in this region. . . .